Thursday, September 12 2019
11:00am - 12:00pm
Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience, Room 1128
For more information:

Ross Ethier, Ph.D. - faculty host

Add To My Calendar
Bioengineering Seminar Series

Kristin Myers, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Columbia University

Kristin M. Myers’ solid mechanics research program studies the biomechanics of biological soft tissues with a specific focus on the female reproductive system and pregnancy. Her Columbia research group is one of only a few engineering teams in the world creating biomechanical models of pregnancy to uncover structural mechanisms of preterm birth. 

Myers builds computational models of the pregnant anatomy to quantify the amount of mechanical loading on the soft tissue structures supporting the fetus. These models are based on rigorous mechanical tests of soft tissues conducted in her lab to establish the mathematical relationship between the tissue’s biological building blocks, its mechanical stiffness, and its remodeling behavior. Working with Maternal Fetal Medicine specialists at Columbia University Medical Center, the team is working to identify mechanical risk factors in pregnancy and to develop precise clinical interventions to eliminate those risks.

Recent projects from Myers’s research group include: ultrasound-based finite element models of pregnancy, mechanical characterization of cervical and uterine tissue remodeling, hormone-mediated tissue growth and remodeling, and mechanical characterization of preterm birth models of pregnancy

Bio:
Myers received a BS in mechanical engineering in 2002 from the University of Michigan and an MS in 2005 and a PhD in 2008 in mechanical engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). She joined the faculty of Columbia Engineering in 2010 and in 2017 received the ASME Y.C. Fung Young Investigators Award. 
 

The Bioengineering Seminar Series is co-hosted by the Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Bioscience, and the Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Georgia Tech and Emory University.

Click images in enlarge.