Tuesday, March 26 2019
12:00pm - 1:00pm
Marcus Nanotechnology Building 1117-1118 | 345 Ferst Drive | Atlanta GA | 30332
Free food
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Nano@Tech: Dimensional Control of Light-Matter Interaction in Perovskite Chalcogenides
Jayakanth Ravichandran
Univ. Southern California - Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

Abstract: Perovskite Chalcogenides are a new class of semiconductors which have tunable band gap in the visible to infrared part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Besides this band gap tunability, they offer a unique opportunity to realize large density of states semiconductors with high carrier mobility. In this talk, I will discuss some of the experimental advances made both in my research group and in the research community on the theory, synthesis of these materials and understanding their optoelectronic properties. Perovskite chalcogenides have a large structural and chemical phase, which allows us finer knobs to tailor light-matter interaction precisely over a broad energy range spanning the visible to infrared spectrum. I will show that controlling dimensionality of these materials has profound influence on the light-matter interaction, which results in novel properties such as highly anisotropic absorption and refraction, unconventional band gap evolution. Finally, I will provide a general outlook for future studies on these exciting new class of materials

 

Bio: Jayakanth Ravichandran is an Assistant Professor in the Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science with courtesy appointment in Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Southern California. He received his Ph.D. degree from University of California, Berkeley in 2011. He performed post-doctoral research at Columbia University and briefly at Harvard University, before beginning this current position. His research interests are in materials design, synthesis, characterization, and physical properties of complex materials for electronic, photonic, and energy applications. He was named an Early Career Scholar by the Journal of Materials Research in 2017 and was a Link Energy Fellow.